voyagesofabookworm:

dreadofapen:

willgrahamscock:

riddlemehiddleston:

mom would you PLEASE JUST INSTALL CHROME

I have seen hell

Exorcizamus te, omnis immundus spiritus,
omnis satanica potestas, omnis incursio infernalis adversarii,omnis congregatio et secta diabolica.Ergo, draco maledicte.Ecclesiam tuam securi tibi facias libertate servire,te rogamus, audi nos.

Did you just exorcise Internet explorer

voyagesofabookworm:

dreadofapen:

willgrahamscock:

riddlemehiddleston:

mom would you PLEASE JUST INSTALL CHROME

I have seen hell

Exorcizamus te, omnis immundus spiritus,

omnis satanica potestas, omnis incursio infernalis adversarii,
omnis congregatio et secta diabolica.

Ergo, draco maledicte.
Ecclesiam tuam securi tibi facias libertate servire,
te rogamus, audi nos.

Did you just exorcise Internet explorer

(via penguinssonamor)

Poor Bill, RIP

Poor Bill, RIP

"I’m so disappointed in Cameron. 20$ says he’s sitting in his car, debating about whether or not he should go out."

(via heathereverdeen)

posts about snow in spring!? fuck you. but spring?! no. fuck you. unless the weather is catastrophic. fuck. you. (see scale for reference)

posts about snow in spring!? fuck you. but spring?! no. fuck you. unless the weather is catastrophic. fuck. you. (see scale for reference)

theatlantic:

The Underrated, Universal Appeal of Science-Fiction

When I’m introduced to someone as a writer, a now familiar pattern of events often follows.
“Oh, really! How interesting!” the someone—let’s call her Jane—says, sounding quite enthusiastic. “What do you write?”
“Science fiction,” I say.
Jane instantly glazes over. “I’m afraid I never read science fiction.”
In other instances, people who know me have read a book of mine out of curiosity and then told me, in some surprise, that they liked it—“even though I don’t normally like science fiction.” Indeed, when a short story collection of mine won a non-genre prize, it was apparently a surprise to the judges themselves: According to the chair of the judging panel, “none of [them] knew they were science-fiction fans beforehand.”
The assumption seems to be that a book that comes with a genre label like “science fiction” must necessarily be lightweight stuff—not really comparable with “non-genre” works.
This may partly be due to the fact that the word “genre” has two different meanings which are often muddled up. The basic meaning of “genre” is simply kind or category or form of fiction, and in that sense, any work of fiction can be assigned to some genre or another. But “genre” is also used in a different way to make a distinction between “genre” and “non-genre” fiction. “Non-genre” fiction is the stuff that is placed on the “general fiction” or “fiction and literature” shelves in Barnes and Noble. “Genre” fiction is the stuff that is placed in its own designated corners: Crime, Fantasy, Romance, Horror, Science Fiction.
Read more. [Image: Phil Whitehouse / Flickr]

theatlantic:

The Underrated, Universal Appeal of Science-Fiction

When I’m introduced to someone as a writer, a now familiar pattern of events often follows.

“Oh, really! How interesting!” the someone—let’s call her Jane—says, sounding quite enthusiastic. “What do you write?”

“Science fiction,” I say.

Jane instantly glazes over. “I’m afraid I never read science fiction.”

In other instances, people who know me have read a book of mine out of curiosity and then told me, in some surprise, that they liked it—“even though I don’t normally like science fiction.” Indeed, when a short story collection of mine won a non-genre prize, it was apparently a surprise to the judges themselves: According to the chair of the judging panel, “none of [them] knew they were science-fiction fans beforehand.”

The assumption seems to be that a book that comes with a genre label like “science fiction” must necessarily be lightweight stuff—not really comparable with “non-genre” works.

This may partly be due to the fact that the word “genre” has two different meanings which are often muddled up. The basic meaning of “genre” is simply kind or category or form of fiction, and in that sense, any work of fiction can be assigned to some genre or another. But “genre” is also used in a different way to make a distinction between “genre” and “non-genre” fiction. “Non-genre” fiction is the stuff that is placed on the “general fiction” or “fiction and literature” shelves in Barnes and Noble. “Genre” fiction is the stuff that is placed in its own designated corners: Crime, Fantasy, Romance, Horror, Science Fiction.

Read more. [Image: Phil Whitehouse / Flickr]

soundsodd:

William Klein - Club Allegro Fortissimo, Paris, 1990

soundsodd:

William Klein - Club Allegro Fortissimo, Paris, 1990

(via queerliness)

gaycouplethings:

I kinda sucks that unless you’re in the gayborhood you have to avoid showing affection in public places

gaycouplethings:

I kinda sucks that unless you’re in the gayborhood you have to avoid showing affection in public places

nationalaquarium:

Did you know? Mary river turtles are sometimes referred to as “bum-breathers” because their tails are lined with gill-like structures that allow them to extract oxygen from water! 
Learn more about this amazing (and critically endangered) species in today’s Animal Update.

nationalaquarium:

Did you know? Mary river turtles are sometimes referred to as “bum-breathers” because their tails are lined with gill-like structures that allow them to extract oxygen from water! 

Learn more about this amazing (and critically endangered) species in today’s Animal Update.

adulthoodisokay:

fieldnotesfromabroad:

I need an aspirin or 100.

make it stop

(via braiker)